Trustees

 The Oxford Transplant Foundation is very proud to have the following Trustees:

Carol Bradford

Carol Bradford is Company Secretary and Trustee.  She is responsible for ensuring all legal documents pertaining to the Foundation are completed and submitted in a timely fashion and assisting with fundraising.

She has spent her career working in an administrative capacity within the NHS.  Her roles have included Personal Secretary and Practice Manager in General Practice.  She has some experience of organising meetings of various sizes.  Prior to retirement in 2014 Carol worked as Assistant to Professor Friend with whom she worked for 14 years. 

James Datnow

James Datnow is the Treasurer of the Oxford Transplant Foundation and is responsible under law, with the other Trustees, for the running of the Oxford Transplant Foundation. He is responsible for proper financial governance, maintenance of the financial books and records and the production of monthly and annual accounts for the Foundation

James became involved with OTF after his daughter received a heart transplant aged one, she is now six years post-transplant and going from strength to strength; she has regular check-ups at the John Radcliffe. She now has four younger brothers and they all live in Oxfordshire.

James trained as an accountant and now works in property finance and investment. He rowed internationally at university and keeps on training when he can - he would like to be competitive again if time and my body allows!

Professor Peter Friend

Professor Friend studied medicine at Cambridge and St Thomas’s Hospital and after qualifying trained as a surgeon in London and Cambridge before undertaking a period of research at the University of Cambridge under the supervision of Professor Sir Roy Calne.

In 1988 he was appointed Visiting Assistant Professor of Surgery at Indiana University Medical Center, USA, where he was responsible for initiating a programme of liver transplantation.  He returned to the UK in 1989 to take up the post of University Lecturer (Honorary Consultant) in the University Department of Surgery at Cambridge. He was the Clinical Director of the Cambridge Transplant Unit and also a Fellow and Director of Studies in Medicine at Magdalene College, Cambridge. 

In 1999 he was appointed to the post of Professor of Transplantation at the University of Oxford and Consultant Transplant and Hepatobiliary Surgeon at the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust.  At that time he was also appointed Director of the Oxford Transplant Centre. 

Since Professor Friend came to Oxford the numbers and types of transplant have increased.  The Unit now undertakes, kidney, kidney and pancreas, pancreas alone, islet and intestinal transplants.  Oxford is the largest (in terms of numbers of transplants carried out each year) pancreas transplant unit in the world.    

Peter's research interests lie primarily in novel applications of normothermic organ perfusion, ranging from its use for extracorporeal support to preservation and repair prior to transplantation. He has published over 25 papers on the topic of normothermic perfusion, the basis of the OrganOx technology, as well as in the areas of clinical transplantation, immunosuppression, monoclonal antibodies, xenotransplantation, liver perfusion and aspects of general surgery.

Peter is one of two academic founders of OrganOx and has been its medical director since April 2008, being primarily responsible for the pre-clinical and clinical trials of OrganOx's patented normothermic organ perfusion technology.

Professor Susan Fuggle

Susan Fuggle was awarded her Doctor of Philosophy in transplant immunology and immunogenetics by the University of Oxford, after graduating with BSc and MSc degrees in Biochemistry and Medical Biochemistry, respectively, from the University of Manchester, UK. She has conducted research in histocompatibility and transplantation for many years. In 2000 she was appointed to a Consultant Clinical Scientist post at the Oxford Transplant Centre, where she directs the Transplant Immunology and Immunogenetics Laboratory which supports the transplant programmes within the Oxford University Hospitals (OUH) NHS Trust. She is a Professor of Transplant Immunology at the University of Oxford, actively involved in research into transplantation. Her research interests include biomarkers of allograft dysfunction and ischaemia /reperfusion injury. Professor Fuggle is also the Scientific Advisor to Organ Donation and Transplantation, a division of NHS Blood and Transplant, having been appointed to the role at the predecessor organisation, UKTSSA, in 1995. She has a major interest in organ allocation and chaired the Kidney Advisory Group Allocation Task Force which resulted in the implementation of the 2006 UK National Kidney Allocation Scheme.

Professor Fuggle is a Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists and undertakes a number of professional activities. She was recently the Chair of the British Society of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics, and has previously served terms as a Councillor of the British Transplantation Society.  She is member of the Editorial Board of the journal ‘Transplantation’ and of the European Federation for Immunogenetics (EFI) Standards Committee.

 

Deborah Hoult

Deborah Hoult is Chairman, Trustee and Committee Member.  She is responsible under law, with the other Trustees, for the running of the Oxford Transplant Foundation. She chairs the Trustees meetings and represents the Charity in its dealings with other organisations.

Deborah says that she is  ‘paying back’ for the successful kidney transplant her husband had in 2009 as well as for the support from the Living Donor scheme which enabled her to donate one of her kidneys to him.

She is a scientist who spent nearly 35 years working in Atomic Spectroscopy. She is no longer employed but has found so many activities that engage her, she finds it is difficult to imagine how she once had time for fulltime employment.

Professor Sir Peter John Morris

Sir Peter Morris, an Australian, is Nuffield Professor of Surgery Emeritus at the University of Oxford and Emeritus Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. He graduated from the Medical School of the University of Melbourne and St Vincent's Hospital, and received his surgical training in Australia, the UK and the USA. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and the American College of Surgeons. In 1974 he moved from his position as Reader in Surgery at the University of Melbourne to the Nuffield Chair of Surgery and Chairman of Department at the University of Oxford and the Oxford Hospitals and a fellow of Balliol College, positions he held until the end of 2001. In 2001 he was elected as President of The Royal College of Surgeons of England, demitting office in 2004. From 2003 to 2009 he served as Chairman of the British Heart Foundation and as President of the Medical Protection Society from 2005-15.  He chairs several Scientific Advisory Boards in Europe. Since 2005 he has been Director of the Centre for Evidence in Transplantation, and an Honorary Professor within the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine of the University of London.

His clinical interests have been in transplantation and vascular surgery, and, after going to Oxford, he established the Oxford Transplant Centre and a major unit in vascular surgery. His professional scientific career has revolved around transplantation and transplantation biology, especially in the immune response to histocompatibility antigens and its suppression. His many contributions include the first description of cytotoxic antibodies in man after renal transplantation,  the definition of autoantibodies in potential recipients of transplants, the induction of tolerance to allografts in experimental models, and the role of matching for HLA in renal transplantation. In addition, in the earlier part of his career he made many contributions to the knowledge of the association between HLA and disease, as well as playing a major part in early anthropological studies of HLA around the Pacific Rim. His current interests are devoted to improving the quality of evidence available in clinical organ transplantation.

He is a former President of The Transplantation Society, the British Transplantation Society, the International Surgical Society and the European Surgical Association. He has received a number of prizes for his work including the Lister Medal, the Hunterian Medal and the Medawar Prize. He was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society and the Academy of Medical Sciences in the UK and in the USA as a foreign member of the National Academy of Medicine and  of the American Philosophical Society.

He has been awarded many Honorary Fellowships including those of the American College of Surgeons, the American Surgical Association, the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, the German Surgical Society, the Japanese Surgical Society, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh, Glasgow and Ireland. He has honorary Doctorates of Science of the University of Hong Kong and Imperial College, London, and an honorary Doctorate of Laws of the University of Melbourne. He has also delivered over 30 eponymous lectures throughout the world and has held visiting professorships in over 50 institutions. He is the Editor of Kidney Transplantation: Principals and Practice, regarded as the authoritative book in the field, now in its 7th edition, and also of the widely acclaimed Oxford Textbook of Surgery which is in its 2nd edition. In 1996 he received a Knighthood from the Queen for services to medicine and in 2004 he was made a Companion of the Order of Australia for services to medical science.

 

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© Oxford Transplant Foundation 2015 (Last Updated:06/04/2017 )

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 The Oxford Transplant Foundation is very proud to have the following Trustees:

Carol Bradford

Carol Bradford is Company Secretary and Trustee.  She is responsible for ensuring all legal documents pertaining to the Foundation are completed and submitted in a timely fashion and assisting with fundraising.

She has spent her career working in an administrative capacity within the NHS.  Her roles have included Personal Secretary and Practice Manager in General Practice.  She has some experience of organising meetings of various sizes.  Prior to retirement in 2014 Carol worked as Assistant to Professor Friend with whom she worked for 14 years. 

James Datnow

James Datnow is the Treasurer of the Oxford Transplant Foundation and is responsible under law, with the other Trustees, for the running of the Oxford Transplant Foundation. He is responsible for proper financial governance, maintenance of the financial books and records and the production of monthly and annual accounts for the Foundation

James became involved with OTF after his daughter received a heart transplant aged one, she is now six years post-transplant and going from strength to strength; she has regular check-ups at the John Radcliffe. She now has four younger brothers and they all live in Oxfordshire.

James trained as an accountant and now works in property finance and investment. He rowed internationally at university and keeps on training when he can - he would like to be competitive again if time and my body allows!

Professor Peter Friend

Professor Friend studied medicine at Cambridge and St Thomas’s Hospital and after qualifying trained as a surgeon in London and Cambridge before undertaking a period of research at the University of Cambridge under the supervision of Professor Sir Roy Calne.

In 1988 he was appointed Visiting Assistant Professor of Surgery at Indiana University Medical Center, USA, where he was responsible for initiating a programme of liver transplantation.  He returned to the UK in 1989 to take up the post of University Lecturer (Honorary Consultant) in the University Department of Surgery at Cambridge. He was the Clinical Director of the Cambridge Transplant Unit and also a Fellow and Director of Studies in Medicine at Magdalene College, Cambridge. 

In 1999 he was appointed to the post of Professor of Transplantation at the University of Oxford and Consultant Transplant and Hepatobiliary Surgeon at the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust.  At that time he was also appointed Director of the Oxford Transplant Centre. 

Since Professor Friend came to Oxford the numbers and types of transplant have increased.  The Unit now undertakes, kidney, kidney and pancreas, pancreas alone, islet and intestinal transplants.  Oxford is the largest (in terms of numbers of transplants carried out each year) pancreas transplant unit in the world.    

Peter's research interests lie primarily in novel applications of normothermic organ perfusion, ranging from its use for extracorporeal support to preservation and repair prior to transplantation. He has published over 25 papers on the topic of normothermic perfusion, the basis of the OrganOx technology, as well as in the areas of clinical transplantation, immunosuppression, monoclonal antibodies, xenotransplantation, liver perfusion and aspects of general surgery.

Peter is one of two academic founders of OrganOx and has been its medical director since April 2008, being primarily responsible for the pre-clinical and clinical trials of OrganOx's patented normothermic organ perfusion technology.

Professor Susan Fuggle

Susan Fuggle was awarded her Doctor of Philosophy in transplant immunology and immunogenetics by the University of Oxford, after graduating with BSc and MSc degrees in Biochemistry and Medical Biochemistry, respectively, from the University of Manchester, UK. She has conducted research in histocompatibility and transplantation for many years. In 2000 she was appointed to a Consultant Clinical Scientist post at the Oxford Transplant Centre, where she directs the Transplant Immunology and Immunogenetics Laboratory which supports the transplant programmes within the Oxford University Hospitals (OUH) NHS Trust. She is a Professor of Transplant Immunology at the University of Oxford, actively involved in research into transplantation. Her research interests include biomarkers of allograft dysfunction and ischaemia /reperfusion injury. Professor Fuggle is also the Scientific Advisor to Organ Donation and Transplantation, a division of NHS Blood and Transplant, having been appointed to the role at the predecessor organisation, UKTSSA, in 1995. She has a major interest in organ allocation and chaired the Kidney Advisory Group Allocation Task Force which resulted in the implementation of the 2006 UK National Kidney Allocation Scheme.

Professor Fuggle is a Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists and undertakes a number of professional activities. She was recently the Chair of the British Society of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics, and has previously served terms as a Councillor of the British Transplantation Society.  She is member of the Editorial Board of the journal ‘Transplantation’ and of the European Federation for Immunogenetics (EFI) Standards Committee.

 

Deborah Hoult

Deborah Hoult is Chairman, Trustee and Committee Member.  She is responsible under law, with the other Trustees, for the running of the Oxford Transplant Foundation. She chairs the Trustees meetings and represents the Charity in its dealings with other organisations.

Deborah says that she is  ‘paying back’ for the successful kidney transplant her husband had in 2009 as well as for the support from the Living Donor scheme which enabled her to donate one of her kidneys to him.

She is a scientist who spent nearly 35 years working in Atomic Spectroscopy. She is no longer employed but has found so many activities that engage her, she finds it is difficult to imagine how she once had time for fulltime employment.

Professor Sir Peter John Morris

Sir Peter Morris, an Australian, is Nuffield Professor of Surgery Emeritus at the University of Oxford and Emeritus Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. He graduated from the Medical School of the University of Melbourne and St Vincent's Hospital, and received his surgical training in Australia, the UK and the USA. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and the American College of Surgeons. In 1974 he moved from his position as Reader in Surgery at the University of Melbourne to the Nuffield Chair of Surgery and Chairman of Department at the University of Oxford and the Oxford Hospitals and a fellow of Balliol College, positions he held until the end of 2001. In 2001 he was elected as President of The Royal College of Surgeons of England, demitting office in 2004. From 2003 to 2009 he served as Chairman of the British Heart Foundation and as President of the Medical Protection Society from 2005-15.  He chairs several Scientific Advisory Boards in Europe. Since 2005 he has been Director of the Centre for Evidence in Transplantation, and an Honorary Professor within the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine of the University of London.

His clinical interests have been in transplantation and vascular surgery, and, after going to Oxford, he established the Oxford Transplant Centre and a major unit in vascular surgery. His professional scientific career has revolved around transplantation and transplantation biology, especially in the immune response to histocompatibility antigens and its suppression. His many contributions include the first description of cytotoxic antibodies in man after renal transplantation,  the definition of autoantibodies in potential recipients of transplants, the induction of tolerance to allografts in experimental models, and the role of matching for HLA in renal transplantation. In addition, in the earlier part of his career he made many contributions to the knowledge of the association between HLA and disease, as well as playing a major part in early anthropological studies of HLA around the Pacific Rim. His current interests are devoted to improving the quality of evidence available in clinical organ transplantation.

He is a former President of The Transplantation Society, the British Transplantation Society, the International Surgical Society and the European Surgical Association. He has received a number of prizes for his work including the Lister Medal, the Hunterian Medal and the Medawar Prize. He was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society and the Academy of Medical Sciences in the UK and in the USA as a foreign member of the National Academy of Medicine and  of the American Philosophical Society.

He has been awarded many Honorary Fellowships including those of the American College of Surgeons, the American Surgical Association, the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, the German Surgical Society, the Japanese Surgical Society, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh, Glasgow and Ireland. He has honorary Doctorates of Science of the University of Hong Kong and Imperial College, London, and an honorary Doctorate of Laws of the University of Melbourne. He has also delivered over 30 eponymous lectures throughout the world and has held visiting professorships in over 50 institutions. He is the Editor of Kidney Transplantation: Principals and Practice, regarded as the authoritative book in the field, now in its 7th edition, and also of the widely acclaimed Oxford Textbook of Surgery which is in its 2nd edition. In 1996 he received a Knighthood from the Queen for services to medicine and in 2004 he was made a Companion of the Order of Australia for services to medical science.