News

News and updates from funded research projects and fundraising activities.

 

Funded Research Projects

Pump Priming Research Grants Awarded

Three pump priming grants have been awarded since we started these awards in the Spring of last year.  Below are the names of the three recipients together with a brief description of their research project.  Each project will last approximately one year and at the end of this time the recipient will write a report on their research and the outcome.  These reports will be available on our website as soon as they become available. 

Maria Kaiser – June 2016

Searching in donor urine for peptides generated from injured donor kidneys

Urine is used for monitoring the state and function of kidneys. Deceased donor kidneys that offered for transplantation could undergo injury during brain death, donor management and following transplantation will have either suboptimal function or fail to function. As the donor age increases the onset of kidney injury with suboptimal transplantation outcomes is more likely. Based on previous experimental work my proposed study aims to analyze donor urine collected during donor management and just prior to kidney retrieval to identify peptides that have been generated from injure kidneys. This research will provide evidences on which kidneys should be declined for transplantation as “high risk” but in addition will provide an evidence based decision to accept more kidneys that now are discarded without evidences of kidney injury. These research outcomes can be applied in early diagnosis of kidney disease.

Sham Dholakia – October 2016

Using anti-inflammatory medication to improve pancreas transplantation

Pancreas transplantation can cure diabetes, but the surgery is complicated and has risks. One of the big problems with the surgery is inflammation. When the pancreas is transplanted it becomes inflamed and causes a condition called pancreatitis, which makes patients very ill. It affects 50% of all patients having the surgery. 

Understanding and combating this problem is clearly attractive, and we hope the use of a new drug will dampen the inflammation and avoid these complications. We want to use this medicine combined with a scan to monitor the pancreas and collect information in hope that it improves outcomes for patients.

Shruti Mittal – February 2017

Monitoring people with pancreas transplants

Diabetes is a common and growing problem, caused when a person’s pancreas does not produce enough insulin to control their blood sugar. Some people with diabetes develop very severe complications, including kidney failure, eye damage, nerve damage and cardiovascular disease, and may be offered a pancreas transplant. This removes the need for insulin, increases life expectancy, potentially improves other complications and greatly enhances quality of life. However, the transplant can fail at any time, usually without warning and with no time to treat the cause. We need to be able to monitor pancreas transplants more effectively, so that we can identify problems and, by intervening earlier, enable pancreas transplants to last longer.

This project continues from our previous work and will help us to understand how best to monitor people after pancreas transplantation. We plan to investigate 30 people very closely for one year after their pancreas transplant with different tests of pancreas function. We should discover which patients are most likely to have their pancreas stop working, how we could have predicted it earlier and which test was the best. We believe that this information will tell us how we should monitor patients with pancreas transplants more effectively and how to put this into practice. If successful, this work will allow pancreas transplants to work better and for longer.

Funded Travel Grants

 Annual Conference of the British Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics

 Last autumn, the Oxford Transplant Foundation generously funded bursaries for 9 members of the Oxford Transplant Immunology and Immunogenetics Laboratory (also known as Tissue Typing) to attend the 27th Annual Conference of the British Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics held over two days in mid-September at Keble College, Oxford.  Being local to the laboratory, and therefore without the cost of travel and accommodation, this was a perfect and rare opportunity for a larger group to attend and benefit from our field’s flagship annual conference.

The formal lectures and short abstract presentations provide an excellent learning opportunity for the delegates; however the exchange of ideas between delegates that occurred during the conference was invaluable.  All of the Oxford Transplant Immunology Laboratory members receiving bursaries were extremely grateful to the Foundation for the opportunity to participate in BSHI 2016. Here are a few representative quotes…

 “As I am new to the field of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics, attending the conference gave me a greater awareness of the current developments within this area.”

“It was a privilege to be able to attend this year’s conference; it gave me many pertinent thinking points to take away to further my own education and our work in the Transplant Immunology Laboratory.”

“I work in both the Transplant Immunology Laboratory and as a theatre practitioner during the organ recovery process; it was really beneficial to put my practical knowledge into context within Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics.”

Here are some highlights from the conference:

The opening lecture, given by Professor Paul Moss from the University of Birmingham, was entitled “The Immunology of Haemopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation – the Major Determinant of Clinical Outcome” and examined the outcomes of bone marrow transplant and how survival can be improved. The talk started by looking at the mechanisms by which the bone marrow transplants are lost and how graft versus host disease occurs and the current methods for reducing these undesirable outcomes. Professor Moss went on to discuss upcoming methods to improve the body’s immunological response to a bone marrow transplant by creating personalised approaches for each patient, methods such as blocking receptors to important molecules called chemokines and using short protein molecules (peptides) as a vaccine.

Remaining on the theme of transplanting isolated cells Paul Johnson, Professor of Paediatric Surgery at the University of Oxford and Director of Oxford Islet Transplant Programme gave a very interesting lecture on the current status and future opportunities of pancreatic islet transplantation as a cure for type 1 diabetes. He started by outlining the developments in pancreas transplantation and then made the argument for using purified islets in some cases instead of a whole pancreas.  He identified some key benefits such as a reduced risk of the procedure, the potential to transplant children and that islet transplants perform very well in reducing or even eliminating hypoglycaemia unawareness. He went on to give a fascinating overview of how the islets are isolated and purified prior to transplant.

Professor Johnson also spoke about his current research, with the principal area relating to pancreatic islet transplantation for juvenile-onset diabetes. He acknowledged the challenges associated with this, including the ultimate challenge of undergoing an islet transplant without the need for immunosuppression, but spoke of current promising strategies such as physically preventing the immune system from having access to the islet graft.

This session was followed by lunch during which there were highly pertinent presentations relating to the training of new scientists in the histocompatibility field.  Useful guidance was also given for previously-trained scientists who may need to have their current qualifications ratified under a new structure.

At the BSHI conferences scientists are given the opportunity to present research and clinical data as short ‘abstract’ presentations.  In the Best Abstract session there were a number of presentations of data from individual centres which generated useful discussion of a range of topics including kidney and small bowel transplantation.

In the second plenary session Rachel Johnson, Head of Organ Donation and Transplantation Studies from the Clinical Directorate of NHS Blood and Transplant, gave a talk entitled ‘Latest trends in Organ Donation and Kidney Transplantation in the UK’. Following the successful launch of the Organ Donation Taskforce in 2007/8 there has been a significant increase in deceased donors and in the number of organs transplanted from these donors leading to a record number of transplants in 2015/2016. This increase in activity may in part be explained by an increase in our ability to make good use of organs from different donors.

Other invited speakers included Professor Tim Elliot from the University of Southampton who discussed computational modelling of molecules involved in transplant compatibility and Dr Bob Vaughan, who talked about how high resolution HLA typing can help in understanding HLA antibody reactivity.  This session concluded with the Presidential Address from Professor John Forsythe who gave a fascinating update on the current status of transplantation in the UK.

Each year the BSHI conferences invites eminent speakers to give lectures honouring two great leaders in the field of Histocompatibility, namely Professor Hilliard Festenstein and Professor Paul Terasaki.  The Festenstein lecture was given by Professor Kathryn Wood who gave a very enlightening presentation entitled “Immune regulation in transplantation” on the use of regulatory T cells for immunotherapy. She described the ‘One Study’, in which the Oxford Transplant Centre has participated, and discussed potential developments from this study. The Terasaki lecture, entitled “Assessment and Management of Post-Transplant Donor-Specific Antibody” was delivered by Professor Robert Montgomery, who is now the Director of the New York University Langone Transplant Institute.  Earlier in his career he was based in Oxford and performed his doctoral research in transplantation.  He discussed the development of HLA antibodies following transplantation and immunosuppressive regimes.

The following members of the Transplant Immunology Laboratory, Oxford were generously funded by the Oxford Transplant Foundation and are very grateful for the opportunity of participating in this conference:

Juliet Agudelo, Martin Barnardo, Mian Chen, Gemma Cutland, Ash Haeger, Jamie Jameson, Hannah Kenworthy, Helen Sansom and Maggie Sutton.

Visit to Erasmus Medical Centre

Sandra Dix and Claire Snelgrove applied to the Oxford Transplant Foundation for a travel grant to enable them to visit Erasmus University Medical Centre in The Netherlands to see how their living donor transplant assessments work.  Specifically they want to learn how their patients are introduced to transplantation as a treatment option with particular focus on their approach to visiting patients and their relatives at home and how this has impacted on activity and transplant numbers.  They hope to be able to replicate some of their practices to increase living donor transplant awareness and increase donor numbers.  We will report on their visit when they return.

Travel Grants to attend the Annual Conference of the British Transplantation Society 2017

Shruti Mittal: Receiving a Travel Award from the Oxford Transplant Foundation enabled me to travel to Harrogate to present my work at the British Transplantation Society Annual Congress 2017.  This is the principle meeting of specialists involved in transplantation in the UK and is a forum for presentation of the latest clinical and regulatory developments, as well as of cutting-edge research taking place in the UK.  It was a great honour to be shortlisted for the Medawar medal, and to be given the opportunity to present my research project "Assessment of the association between measures of metabolic function and pancreas graft survival" in a plenary session, and to take questions from experts in the field.  Although I was not selected as the winner for the medal on this occasion, it was a great experience to present to leaders in the field and gave me the opportunity to raise my profile.  Further, I was able to attend the rest of the meeting and learned of many exciting developments, research projects being conducted in the UK and novel and interesting ways to analyse and present data.  The meeting was an excellent forum for networking, discussing ideas with colleagues and building potential collaborations, and I am very grateful to the Oxford Transplant Foundation for helping me to attend.

Katriona O’Donoghue: I would like to thank the Oxford Transplant Foundation for providing the travel grant which allowed me to attend the 20th British Transplantation Society Annual Congress in Harrogate, earlier this year. The congress was a wonderful opportunity for me to meet with clinicians, surgeons, laboratory scientists, nurses and transplant coordinators also involved in transplantation. I attended numerous sessions over the three days and found the programme to be stimulating and thought provoking. Particularly rewarding was the acceptance of my poster, the “Critical appraisal of international clinical practice guidelines in kidney transplantation using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Education (AGREE) II tool: A systematic review” which was displayed electronically throughout the congress.

David Nasralla: The generous travel grant from the Oxford Transplant Foundation, for which I am very grateful, enabled me to attend the 20th Annual Congress of the British Transplantation Society in Harrogate. I made several presentations of the results from my DPhil work investigating the potential benefits of normothermic liver preservation. I was shortlisted for the Calne-Williams medal for my work describing the utilisation of bile salts by the liver.  I was awarded the prestigious Medawar medal for my work conducting the COPE clinical trial comparing normothermic machine perfusion with conventional static cold storage in liver transplantation.

Letizia Lo Faro: Thanks to the Oxford Transplant Foundation travel grant I was able to attend the British Transplantation Society annual Congress in Harrogate, in March 2017. At the meeting I presented a poster titled “Metabolic Dysregulation and Mitochondrial Dysfunction Are Key Features of Injury Profiles of Donor Kidneys after Brain and Circulatory Death”, describing my work investigating injury patterns in deceased kidney donors and how to target these therapeutically to improve graft quality. As well as presenting my work to a large audience, attending the meeting allowed me to network with researchers from other institutions and get up to date with recent advances and ground-breaking trials in different areas of transplantation research. The meeting took place in a great venue and had plenty of sessions catering for all sorts of research interests, making it such an interest meeting to attend every year.

Maria Kaiser: I was fortunate to be the recipient of an Oxford Transplant Foundation travel grant which supported my attendance in the British Transplantation Society Congress held in Harrogate in March 2017. My research work “Proteomic profiles of deceased donor kidney biopsies obtained prior to transplantation correlate with allograft function at one year” was selected for presentation in the Six of the Best oral presentations session at the 20th annual Congress. I am very grateful to the Foundation and its supporters for this assistance.

Rebeca Arroyo Hornero : The Oxford Transplant Foundation Travel Grant has allowed me to attend to the Annual Congress of the British Transplantation Society, which took place in March 2017 in Harrogate. Attending this congress was a great experience and enabled me to meet other researchers and clinicians working within the field and to establish networking connections. I gave a mini oral presentation with the title "Role of the CD27-CD70 pathway in the biology and suppressive function of human regulatory T cells", and received very useful feedback. It has been an invaluable opportunity to present some results of my DPhil research project, meet new colleagues and learn the latest news in transplantation research.

 

 

 

Fundraisers News

Fundraisers news and updates:

Mark Tompkinson has a huge story to tell…..and an invitation…..

Intensive Care to 10K

In January 2014, I was diagnosed with Pseudomyxoma Peritonei (PMP); a rare form of incurable abdominal cancer that affects only one or two people in every million in the UK each year.

In 2016 and following two major operations and three rounds of chemotherapy treatment, I was given, at best, only 18 months to live on palliative care. I was then offered pioneering transplantation surgery as a treatment option and after I agreed to go ahead I had to undertake a series of tests to make sure I was suitable for organ donation/capable of undertaking the surgery. Having successfully completed the tests I was then fortunate enough to benefit from the gift of organ donation and from the extraordinary work being conducted at the Oxford Transplant Centre – a multi organ transplant procedure. Following a 17 hour operation which was undertaken by three specialist teams the transplant was successfully completed and in doing so I became only the third person in the world with PMP to survive such a life-saving transplant operation. 

During the surgery, I had a 25kg tumour (4 stone) removed from my abdomen, along with my pancreas, stomach, large and small bowel, spleen, gall bladder, duodenum and abdominal wall. My liver also had to be stripped. This was in addition to two other organs removed during previous surgery.

The work being carried out at the Oxford Transplant Centre is, in my opinion, nothing short of miraculous, and it is vital that such a wonderful team that gives hope to so many is properly funded and supported. The centre carries out a range of transplant procedures, as well as the pioneering research that makes operations like mine possible. 

That’s why I have decided, along with friends and family, to undertake the challenge of jogging (or maybe walking!) a 10k the 24th  September in Sheffield. I want to help the centre that has given me my life back and provide the same opportunities for patients who require their own life-saving transplant operations. Given that not so long ago I was in intensive care with my life on the edge, undertaking a 10k will be a huge personal challenge, but it’s one that I’m relishing in the knowledge that we can raise vital funds for such a brilliant cause. If you also want to join us on the 10k to raise funds for the Oxford Transplant Foundation please visit the following link: 
http://www.runforall.com/10k/sheffield/

 
So, if you can just spare the equivalent of the price of a chocolate bar, a bacon sandwich or a cup of coffee for my 'Just Giving' page you’ll be helping to support work that will save lives and give hope to many.   

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Mark-Tompkinson

 

 

Raising funds for the sole benefit of the Oxford Transplant Centre....
Raising funds for the sole benefit of the Oxford Transplant Centre....
Everyone can help us raise awareness of organ donation and save lives. Join us in encouraging more people to sign up to the NHS Organ Donor Register ....
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News and updates from funded research projects and fundraising activities.

 

Funded Research Projects

Pump Priming Research Grants Awarded

Three pump priming grants have been awarded since we started these awards in the Spring of last year.  Below are the names of the three recipients together with a brief description of their research project.  Each project will last approximately one year and at the end of this time the recipient will write a report on their research and the outcome.  These reports will be available on our website as soon as they become available. 

Maria Kaiser – June 2016

Searching in donor urine for peptides generated from injured donor kidneys

Urine is used for monitoring the state and function of kidneys. Deceased donor kidneys that offered for transplantation could undergo injury during brain death, donor management and following transplantation will have either suboptimal function or fail to function. As the donor age increases the onset of kidney injury with suboptimal transplantation outcomes is more likely. Based on previous experimental work my proposed study aims to analyze donor urine collected during donor management and just prior to kidney retrieval to identify peptides that have been generated from injure kidneys. This research will provide evidences on which kidneys should be declined for transplantation as “high risk” but in addition will provide an evidence based decision to accept more kidneys that now are discarded without evidences of kidney injury. These research outcomes can be applied in early diagnosis of kidney disease.

Sham Dholakia – October 2016

Using anti-inflammatory medication to improve pancreas transplantation

Pancreas transplantation can cure diabetes, but the surgery is complicated and has risks. One of the big problems with the surgery is inflammation. When the pancreas is transplanted it becomes inflamed and causes a condition called pancreatitis, which makes patients very ill. It affects 50% of all patients having the surgery. 

Understanding and combating this problem is clearly attractive, and we hope the use of a new drug will dampen the inflammation and avoid these complications. We want to use this medicine combined with a scan to monitor the pancreas and collect information in hope that it improves outcomes for patients.

Shruti Mittal – February 2017

Monitoring people with pancreas transplants

Diabetes is a common and growing problem, caused when a person’s pancreas does not produce enough insulin to control their blood sugar. Some people with diabetes develop very severe complications, including kidney failure, eye damage, nerve damage and cardiovascular disease, and may be offered a pancreas transplant. This removes the need for insulin, increases life expectancy, potentially improves other complications and greatly enhances quality of life. However, the transplant can fail at any time, usually without warning and with no time to treat the cause. We need to be able to monitor pancreas transplants more effectively, so that we can identify problems and, by intervening earlier, enable pancreas transplants to last longer.

This project continues from our previous work and will help us to understand how best to monitor people after pancreas transplantation. We plan to investigate 30 people very closely for one year after their pancreas transplant with different tests of pancreas function. We should discover which patients are most likely to have their pancreas stop working, how we could have predicted it earlier and which test was the best. We believe that this information will tell us how we should monitor patients with pancreas transplants more effectively and how to put this into practice. If successful, this work will allow pancreas transplants to work better and for longer.

Funded Travel Grants

 Annual Conference of the British Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics

 Last autumn, the Oxford Transplant Foundation generously funded bursaries for 9 members of the Oxford Transplant Immunology and Immunogenetics Laboratory (also known as Tissue Typing) to attend the 27th Annual Conference of the British Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics held over two days in mid-September at Keble College, Oxford.  Being local to the laboratory, and therefore without the cost of travel and accommodation, this was a perfect and rare opportunity for a larger group to attend and benefit from our field’s flagship annual conference.

The formal lectures and short abstract presentations provide an excellent learning opportunity for the delegates; however the exchange of ideas between delegates that occurred during the conference was invaluable.  All of the Oxford Transplant Immunology Laboratory members receiving bursaries were extremely grateful to the Foundation for the opportunity to participate in BSHI 2016. Here are a few representative quotes…

 “As I am new to the field of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics, attending the conference gave me a greater awareness of the current developments within this area.”

“It was a privilege to be able to attend this year’s conference; it gave me many pertinent thinking points to take away to further my own education and our work in the Transplant Immunology Laboratory.”

“I work in both the Transplant Immunology Laboratory and as a theatre practitioner during the organ recovery process; it was really beneficial to put my practical knowledge into context within Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics.”

Here are some highlights from the conference:

The opening lecture, given by Professor Paul Moss from the University of Birmingham, was entitled “The Immunology of Haemopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation – the Major Determinant of Clinical Outcome” and examined the outcomes of bone marrow transplant and how survival can be improved. The talk started by looking at the mechanisms by which the bone marrow transplants are lost and how graft versus host disease occurs and the current methods for reducing these undesirable outcomes. Professor Moss went on to discuss upcoming methods to improve the body’s immunological response to a bone marrow transplant by creating personalised approaches for each patient, methods such as blocking receptors to important molecules called chemokines and using short protein molecules (peptides) as a vaccine.

Remaining on the theme of transplanting isolated cells Paul Johnson, Professor of Paediatric Surgery at the University of Oxford and Director of Oxford Islet Transplant Programme gave a very interesting lecture on the current status and future opportunities of pancreatic islet transplantation as a cure for type 1 diabetes. He started by outlining the developments in pancreas transplantation and then made the argument for using purified islets in some cases instead of a whole pancreas.  He identified some key benefits such as a reduced risk of the procedure, the potential to transplant children and that islet transplants perform very well in reducing or even eliminating hypoglycaemia unawareness. He went on to give a fascinating overview of how the islets are isolated and purified prior to transplant.

Professor Johnson also spoke about his current research, with the principal area relating to pancreatic islet transplantation for juvenile-onset diabetes. He acknowledged the challenges associated with this, including the ultimate challenge of undergoing an islet transplant without the need for immunosuppression, but spoke of current promising strategies such as physically preventing the immune system from having access to the islet graft.

This session was followed by lunch during which there were highly pertinent presentations relating to the training of new scientists in the histocompatibility field.  Useful guidance was also given for previously-trained scientists who may need to have their current qualifications ratified under a new structure.

At the BSHI conferences scientists are given the opportunity to present research and clinical data as short ‘abstract’ presentations.  In the Best Abstract session there were a number of presentations of data from individual centres which generated useful discussion of a range of topics including kidney and small bowel transplantation.

In the second plenary session Rachel Johnson, Head of Organ Donation and Transplantation Studies from the Clinical Directorate of NHS Blood and Transplant, gave a talk entitled ‘Latest trends in Organ Donation and Kidney Transplantation in the UK’. Following the successful launch of the Organ Donation Taskforce in 2007/8 there has been a significant increase in deceased donors and in the number of organs transplanted from these donors leading to a record number of transplants in 2015/2016. This increase in activity may in part be explained by an increase in our ability to make good use of organs from different donors.

Other invited speakers included Professor Tim Elliot from the University of Southampton who discussed computational modelling of molecules involved in transplant compatibility and Dr Bob Vaughan, who talked about how high resolution HLA typing can help in understanding HLA antibody reactivity.  This session concluded with the Presidential Address from Professor John Forsythe who gave a fascinating update on the current status of transplantation in the UK.

Each year the BSHI conferences invites eminent speakers to give lectures honouring two great leaders in the field of Histocompatibility, namely Professor Hilliard Festenstein and Professor Paul Terasaki.  The Festenstein lecture was given by Professor Kathryn Wood who gave a very enlightening presentation entitled “Immune regulation in transplantation” on the use of regulatory T cells for immunotherapy. She described the ‘One Study’, in which the Oxford Transplant Centre has participated, and discussed potential developments from this study. The Terasaki lecture, entitled “Assessment and Management of Post-Transplant Donor-Specific Antibody” was delivered by Professor Robert Montgomery, who is now the Director of the New York University Langone Transplant Institute.  Earlier in his career he was based in Oxford and performed his doctoral research in transplantation.  He discussed the development of HLA antibodies following transplantation and immunosuppressive regimes.

The following members of the Transplant Immunology Laboratory, Oxford were generously funded by the Oxford Transplant Foundation and are very grateful for the opportunity of participating in this conference:

Juliet Agudelo, Martin Barnardo, Mian Chen, Gemma Cutland, Ash Haeger, Jamie Jameson, Hannah Kenworthy, Helen Sansom and Maggie Sutton.

Visit to Erasmus Medical Centre

Sandra Dix and Claire Snelgrove applied to the Oxford Transplant Foundation for a travel grant to enable them to visit Erasmus University Medical Centre in The Netherlands to see how their living donor transplant assessments work.  Specifically they want to learn how their patients are introduced to transplantation as a treatment option with particular focus on their approach to visiting patients and their relatives at home and how this has impacted on activity and transplant numbers.  They hope to be able to replicate some of their practices to increase living donor transplant awareness and increase donor numbers.  We will report on their visit when they return.

Travel Grants to attend the Annual Conference of the British Transplantation Society 2017

Shruti Mittal: Receiving a Travel Award from the Oxford Transplant Foundation enabled me to travel to Harrogate to present my work at the British Transplantation Society Annual Congress 2017.  This is the principle meeting of specialists involved in transplantation in the UK and is a forum for presentation of the latest clinical and regulatory developments, as well as of cutting-edge research taking place in the UK.  It was a great honour to be shortlisted for the Medawar medal, and to be given the opportunity to present my research project "Assessment of the association between measures of metabolic function and pancreas graft survival" in a plenary session, and to take questions from experts in the field.  Although I was not selected as the winner for the medal on this occasion, it was a great experience to present to leaders in the field and gave me the opportunity to raise my profile.  Further, I was able to attend the rest of the meeting and learned of many exciting developments, research projects being conducted in the UK and novel and interesting ways to analyse and present data.  The meeting was an excellent forum for networking, discussing ideas with colleagues and building potential collaborations, and I am very grateful to the Oxford Transplant Foundation for helping me to attend.

Katriona O’Donoghue: I would like to thank the Oxford Transplant Foundation for providing the travel grant which allowed me to attend the 20th British Transplantation Society Annual Congress in Harrogate, earlier this year. The congress was a wonderful opportunity for me to meet with clinicians, surgeons, laboratory scientists, nurses and transplant coordinators also involved in transplantation. I attended numerous sessions over the three days and found the programme to be stimulating and thought provoking. Particularly rewarding was the acceptance of my poster, the “Critical appraisal of international clinical practice guidelines in kidney transplantation using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Education (AGREE) II tool: A systematic review” which was displayed electronically throughout the congress.

David Nasralla: The generous travel grant from the Oxford Transplant Foundation, for which I am very grateful, enabled me to attend the 20th Annual Congress of the British Transplantation Society in Harrogate. I made several presentations of the results from my DPhil work investigating the potential benefits of normothermic liver preservation. I was shortlisted for the Calne-Williams medal for my work describing the utilisation of bile salts by the liver.  I was awarded the prestigious Medawar medal for my work conducting the COPE clinical trial comparing normothermic machine perfusion with conventional static cold storage in liver transplantation.

Letizia Lo Faro: Thanks to the Oxford Transplant Foundation travel grant I was able to attend the British Transplantation Society annual Congress in Harrogate, in March 2017. At the meeting I presented a poster titled “Metabolic Dysregulation and Mitochondrial Dysfunction Are Key Features of Injury Profiles of Donor Kidneys after Brain and Circulatory Death”, describing my work investigating injury patterns in deceased kidney donors and how to target these therapeutically to improve graft quality. As well as presenting my work to a large audience, attending the meeting allowed me to network with researchers from other institutions and get up to date with recent advances and ground-breaking trials in different areas of transplantation research. The meeting took place in a great venue and had plenty of sessions catering for all sorts of research interests, making it such an interest meeting to attend every year.

Maria Kaiser: I was fortunate to be the recipient of an Oxford Transplant Foundation travel grant which supported my attendance in the British Transplantation Society Congress held in Harrogate in March 2017. My research work “Proteomic profiles of deceased donor kidney biopsies obtained prior to transplantation correlate with allograft function at one year” was selected for presentation in the Six of the Best oral presentations session at the 20th annual Congress. I am very grateful to the Foundation and its supporters for this assistance.

Rebeca Arroyo Hornero : The Oxford Transplant Foundation Travel Grant has allowed me to attend to the Annual Congress of the British Transplantation Society, which took place in March 2017 in Harrogate. Attending this congress was a great experience and enabled me to meet other researchers and clinicians working within the field and to establish networking connections. I gave a mini oral presentation with the title "Role of the CD27-CD70 pathway in the biology and suppressive function of human regulatory T cells", and received very useful feedback. It has been an invaluable opportunity to present some results of my DPhil research project, meet new colleagues and learn the latest news in transplantation research.

 

 

 

Fundraisers News

Fundraisers news and updates:

Mark Tompkinson has a huge story to tell…..and an invitation…..

Intensive Care to 10K

In January 2014, I was diagnosed with Pseudomyxoma Peritonei (PMP); a rare form of incurable abdominal cancer that affects only one or two people in every million in the UK each year.

In 2016 and following two major operations and three rounds of chemotherapy treatment, I was given, at best, only 18 months to live on palliative care. I was then offered pioneering transplantation surgery as a treatment option and after I agreed to go ahead I had to undertake a series of tests to make sure I was suitable for organ donation/capable of undertaking the surgery. Having successfully completed the tests I was then fortunate enough to benefit from the gift of organ donation and from the extraordinary work being conducted at the Oxford Transplant Centre – a multi organ transplant procedure. Following a 17 hour operation which was undertaken by three specialist teams the transplant was successfully completed and in doing so I became only the third person in the world with PMP to survive such a life-saving transplant operation. 

During the surgery, I had a 25kg tumour (4 stone) removed from my abdomen, along with my pancreas, stomach, large and small bowel, spleen, gall bladder, duodenum and abdominal wall. My liver also had to be stripped. This was in addition to two other organs removed during previous surgery.

The work being carried out at the Oxford Transplant Centre is, in my opinion, nothing short of miraculous, and it is vital that such a wonderful team that gives hope to so many is properly funded and supported. The centre carries out a range of transplant procedures, as well as the pioneering research that makes operations like mine possible. 

That’s why I have decided, along with friends and family, to undertake the challenge of jogging (or maybe walking!) a 10k the 24th  September in Sheffield. I want to help the centre that has given me my life back and provide the same opportunities for patients who require their own life-saving transplant operations. Given that not so long ago I was in intensive care with my life on the edge, undertaking a 10k will be a huge personal challenge, but it’s one that I’m relishing in the knowledge that we can raise vital funds for such a brilliant cause. If you also want to join us on the 10k to raise funds for the Oxford Transplant Foundation please visit the following link: 
http://www.runforall.com/10k/sheffield/

 
So, if you can just spare the equivalent of the price of a chocolate bar, a bacon sandwich or a cup of coffee for my 'Just Giving' page you’ll be helping to support work that will save lives and give hope to many.   

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Mark-Tompkinson

 

 

Raising funds for the sole benefit of the Oxford Transplant Centre....
Raising funds for the sole benefit of the Oxford Transplant Centre....
We need everyone's help. Turn good intentions into action and sign up today by visiting the