News

News and updates from funded research projects and fundraising activities.

 

Funded Research Projects

Pump Priming Research Grants Awarded in 2018

Below are the names of the most recent recipients together with a brief description of their research project. Each project will last approximately one year and at the end of this time the recipient will write a report on their research and the outcome. These reports will be available on our website as soon as they become available.


Matthew Brook
NIHR Academic Clinical Lecturer

Assessment of cell therapy in Transplantation

Approximately 5,000 patients received a kidney transplant in the UK last year and are required to take life-long anti-rejection medications. These are highly effective but have significant side effects.
We are using natural cells from the blood called Tregs, expand in number in the laboratory, to protect a kidney transplant from rejection and reduce the need for anti-rejection medications.
This ground-breaking study aims to discover whether, following Treg infusion into the kidney transplant recipients, we can identify these cells within the kidney transplant itself and prove that they are working to prevent rejection.


Ann Ogbemudia
Research and Clinical Fellow in Transplantation

Islets in skin to treat diabetes

Diabetes Mellitus is a condition where a person’s body loses the ability to adjust their blood sugar putting them at risk of strokes, heart attacks, kidney failure, blindness, limb amputations or premature death.
There are currently 3.7million sufferers in the UK and that figure is rising exponentially.
We promise to take human islet cells that naturally regulate blood sugar from deceased donor pancreas where they reside and incorporate them in small pieces of skin which when transplanted would function as a pancreas. This procedure is easily performed, monitored and removed if necessary in this superficial position in the recipient’s forearm.


Fungai Dengu
Clinical Research Fellow in Transplant Surgery

Profiling the Liver during machine profusion

Donated livers can now be preserved on a machine that pumps blood and oxygen, medicines and nutrients through it at normal body temperature as opposed to storage ‘on-ice’ which is harmful to the organ, especially in marginal donor organs.
Clinical trials have shown excellent results with this new technology. Using samples collected from these studies, we will investigate what happens to immune cells within the liver during preservation with the machine and explore how we may be able to exploit this knowledge of the immune environment to deliver novel immune treatments that can improve patient outcomes.

Funded Travel Grants

Travel Grants Information

2018

Hannah Kenworthy BSHI Conference 2018 (5-6 September 2018)

My attendance at the BSHI conference 2018 has greatly enhanced my experience as a trainee of the British Society of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics diploma by allowing me to attend talks on the latest research in the field, including talks on the impact of the introduction of the 'soft opt-out' organ donation system in Wales and controversies with Organ donation attitudes. I was also able to meet company representatives supplying the laboratory with consumables and the latest technologies and meet the BSHI training representative to discuss training progress and updates. The poster research session gave me a good opportunity to talk to current trainees and qualified Clinical Scientists about the projects they carried out as part of their diploma, giving me insight into the process and scope for a project that I will have to carry out in the future as part of my diploma.

Mohammed Ali Rafique BSHI Conference 2018 (5-6 September 2018)

I have been working as a Biomedical Scientist in H&I since April 2009, and registered as a BSHI trainee in September 2016. I have never attended a BSHI AGM before, despite haveing a poster displayed at the 2016 conference in Oxford. I have once again been successful in writing an abstract for this conference, which has been accepted as a poster; this year I was able to attend and defend my poster. A variety of speakers on many topics gave a broad understanding of the areas in which research is being carried out, and the Terasaki and Festenstein speakers were extremely interesting.

 

2019

Alice Hayward BTS Annual Congress 2019 (6-8 March 2019)

The congress included 3 full days of inspirational talks. These were all extremely educational and I feel that I learnt a great deal, which will help towards my career progression. I learnt about current research and new technologies to improve organ donation and transplantation. In particular, the predictions of how the new opt-out system will effect organ donation in the UK. This will be extremely helpful moving forward for how this may affect mine and my team's workload and how to cope with this potential, additional pressure. I also had the chance to meet scientists from other H&I labs and found it particularly interesting to discuss the different techniques their labs use, information which I can relay back to my colleagues at the Oxford lab.

BTS Annual Congress 2019 (6-8 March 2019)

The British Transplant Society annual conference showcases the latest clinical and translational research in UK organ donation and transplantation. It was beneficial to see presentations on the latest advancements in transplant research and biobanks, and provides a platform to present your own work. I was chosen to present a moderated poster for my work on deceased donor exosome proteomics and subsequently won a poster prize.

Honglei Huang BTS Annual Congress 2019 (6-8 March 2019)

I present my work "Remote ischemic conditioning dampens acute inflammation in kidney transplantation", it contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanism of remote ischaemic conditioning. The project I proposed "Identification of Exosome Proteins Associated with Transplant Outcome from Donor Serum" was presented as poster by my research assistant Adam Thorne and was awarded as one of the 10 best poster in the meeting.

Fundraisers News

Fundraisers news and updates:

 

A skydive is always something that I have wanted to challenge myself to do, My mum attends the renal outpatients at churchhill hospital oxford on a regular basis and is supported by the doctors and nurses,  I thought what better way to say thank you to the departments by raising money for the transplant unit. 

I raised a total of £350 and would like to continuously say thank you for all their great work. “The skydive was an amazing experience jumping from 10,000 feet”

Sasha

 

 Brian Nobbs photo.jpg - 158.35 Kb

 

The Magnolia Golf Club held its’ annual Charity Day on Friday 19th July 2019.

After days of wonderful sunshine, the rain decided to fall just as everyone headed out onto the course.  It continued to be gusty and wet all morning only clearing a bit at lunchtime. Brian took his Captain’s drive earlier in the morning and as each team came round to the first hole they bought a flag to place where they thought the ball had landed. At the end of the day the person who came closest won a bottle of Champagne. When everyone came in from the golf both wet and windswept we sat down to dinner followed by the prize giving and auction. We were very privileged to have a variety of items to auction for the charity.

I’m still waiting on the final figure for the day but at the last count we were up to £4913.00 which is an amazing amount and we still have 8 months ahead to increase the funds more. 

Brian Nobbs (Magnolia Park Golf & Country Club Captain 2019/20)

 

 

 

 

Raising funds for the sole benefit of the Oxford Transplant Centre....
Raising funds for the sole benefit of the Oxford Transplant Centre....
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Contact

News and updates from funded research projects and fundraising activities.

 

Funded Research Projects

Pump Priming Research Grants Awarded in 2018

Below are the names of the most recent recipients together with a brief description of their research project. Each project will last approximately one year and at the end of this time the recipient will write a report on their research and the outcome. These reports will be available on our website as soon as they become available.


Matthew Brook
NIHR Academic Clinical Lecturer

Assessment of cell therapy in Transplantation

Approximately 5,000 patients received a kidney transplant in the UK last year and are required to take life-long anti-rejection medications. These are highly effective but have significant side effects.
We are using natural cells from the blood called Tregs, expand in number in the laboratory, to protect a kidney transplant from rejection and reduce the need for anti-rejection medications.
This ground-breaking study aims to discover whether, following Treg infusion into the kidney transplant recipients, we can identify these cells within the kidney transplant itself and prove that they are working to prevent rejection.


Ann Ogbemudia
Research and Clinical Fellow in Transplantation

Islets in skin to treat diabetes

Diabetes Mellitus is a condition where a person’s body loses the ability to adjust their blood sugar putting them at risk of strokes, heart attacks, kidney failure, blindness, limb amputations or premature death.
There are currently 3.7million sufferers in the UK and that figure is rising exponentially.
We promise to take human islet cells that naturally regulate blood sugar from deceased donor pancreas where they reside and incorporate them in small pieces of skin which when transplanted would function as a pancreas. This procedure is easily performed, monitored and removed if necessary in this superficial position in the recipient’s forearm.


Fungai Dengu
Clinical Research Fellow in Transplant Surgery

Profiling the Liver during machine profusion

Donated livers can now be preserved on a machine that pumps blood and oxygen, medicines and nutrients through it at normal body temperature as opposed to storage ‘on-ice’ which is harmful to the organ, especially in marginal donor organs.
Clinical trials have shown excellent results with this new technology. Using samples collected from these studies, we will investigate what happens to immune cells within the liver during preservation with the machine and explore how we may be able to exploit this knowledge of the immune environment to deliver novel immune treatments that can improve patient outcomes.

Funded Travel Grants

Travel Grants Information

2018

Hannah Kenworthy BSHI Conference 2018 (5-6 September 2018)

My attendance at the BSHI conference 2018 has greatly enhanced my experience as a trainee of the British Society of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics diploma by allowing me to attend talks on the latest research in the field, including talks on the impact of the introduction of the 'soft opt-out' organ donation system in Wales and controversies with Organ donation attitudes. I was also able to meet company representatives supplying the laboratory with consumables and the latest technologies and meet the BSHI training representative to discuss training progress and updates. The poster research session gave me a good opportunity to talk to current trainees and qualified Clinical Scientists about the projects they carried out as part of their diploma, giving me insight into the process and scope for a project that I will have to carry out in the future as part of my diploma.

Mohammed Ali Rafique BSHI Conference 2018 (5-6 September 2018)

I have been working as a Biomedical Scientist in H&I since April 2009, and registered as a BSHI trainee in September 2016. I have never attended a BSHI AGM before, despite haveing a poster displayed at the 2016 conference in Oxford. I have once again been successful in writing an abstract for this conference, which has been accepted as a poster; this year I was able to attend and defend my poster. A variety of speakers on many topics gave a broad understanding of the areas in which research is being carried out, and the Terasaki and Festenstein speakers were extremely interesting.

 

2019

Alice Hayward BTS Annual Congress 2019 (6-8 March 2019)

The congress included 3 full days of inspirational talks. These were all extremely educational and I feel that I learnt a great deal, which will help towards my career progression. I learnt about current research and new technologies to improve organ donation and transplantation. In particular, the predictions of how the new opt-out system will effect organ donation in the UK. This will be extremely helpful moving forward for how this may affect mine and my team's workload and how to cope with this potential, additional pressure. I also had the chance to meet scientists from other H&I labs and found it particularly interesting to discuss the different techniques their labs use, information which I can relay back to my colleagues at the Oxford lab.

BTS Annual Congress 2019 (6-8 March 2019)

The British Transplant Society annual conference showcases the latest clinical and translational research in UK organ donation and transplantation. It was beneficial to see presentations on the latest advancements in transplant research and biobanks, and provides a platform to present your own work. I was chosen to present a moderated poster for my work on deceased donor exosome proteomics and subsequently won a poster prize.

Honglei Huang BTS Annual Congress 2019 (6-8 March 2019)

I present my work "Remote ischemic conditioning dampens acute inflammation in kidney transplantation", it contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanism of remote ischaemic conditioning. The project I proposed "Identification of Exosome Proteins Associated with Transplant Outcome from Donor Serum" was presented as poster by my research assistant Adam Thorne and was awarded as one of the 10 best poster in the meeting.

Fundraisers News

Fundraisers news and updates:

 

A skydive is always something that I have wanted to challenge myself to do, My mum attends the renal outpatients at churchhill hospital oxford on a regular basis and is supported by the doctors and nurses,  I thought what better way to say thank you to the departments by raising money for the transplant unit. 

I raised a total of £350 and would like to continuously say thank you for all their great work. “The skydive was an amazing experience jumping from 10,000 feet”

Sasha

 

 Brian Nobbs photo.jpg - 158.35 Kb

 

The Magnolia Golf Club held its’ annual Charity Day on Friday 19th July 2019.

After days of wonderful sunshine, the rain decided to fall just as everyone headed out onto the course.  It continued to be gusty and wet all morning only clearing a bit at lunchtime. Brian took his Captain’s drive earlier in the morning and as each team came round to the first hole they bought a flag to place where they thought the ball had landed. At the end of the day the person who came closest won a bottle of Champagne. When everyone came in from the golf both wet and windswept we sat down to dinner followed by the prize giving and auction. We were very privileged to have a variety of items to auction for the charity.

I’m still waiting on the final figure for the day but at the last count we were up to £4913.00 which is an amazing amount and we still have 8 months ahead to increase the funds more. 

Brian Nobbs (Magnolia Park Golf & Country Club Captain 2019/20)

 

 

 

 

Raising funds for the sole benefit of the Oxford Transplant Centre....
Raising funds for the sole benefit of the Oxford Transplant Centre....
We need everyone's help. Turn good intentions into action and sign up today by visiting the